3-Part Series: Reflection, Retooling, and Renewal: Strengthening your ability to be a more effective graduate student mentor

3-Part Series: Reflection, Retooling, and Renewal: Strengthening your ability to be a more effective graduate student mentor

Facilitated by Dr. Tera R. Jordan, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development, Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

All graduate faculty and other key stakeholders in graduate education are encouraged to participate in this three-part workshop series. While participants should attend all three sessions, workshop participants may participate in each webinar as their schedules permit. We welcome you to invite faculty colleagues who may benefit from this workshop series.

Essential Resource

Read Jordan’s Teaching Tip:  Mentoring Graduate Student Scholars page

Tera Jordan

Workshop 1: Reflecting on One’s Mentoring Experiences

Friday, September 11 (1:30-3 p.m., online via this Zoom registration web form)

How have you your past mentoring experiences shaped your present mentoring philosophy and practices? In this session, participants will travel down memory lane together and set goals for improving mentoring approaches. Learning objectives will include:

  • Reflecting on your educational journey to discover factors that have contributed to your present mentoring expectations and practices.
  • Exploring mentoring cultures across departments, colleges, and the institution
  • Conducting a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) Analysis relative to your mentoring approaches and setting workshop series goal

Workshop 2: Sharing Mentoring Philosophies: A panel discussion with Margaret Ellen White award winners and Graduate College leaders

Friday, September 18 (1:30-3 p.m., online via this Zoom registration web form)

What similarities and differences arise in the mentoring philosophies and approaches of the Margaret Ellen White award recipients? Award-winning graduate faculty and Graduate College leaders will share their wisdom and best practices. Learning objectives will include:

  • Reflecting on Workshop 1 learning objectives and key summary points
  • Hearing from award-winning graduate faculty about their mentoring philosophies
  • Crafting/revising your mentoring philosophy

Panelists:

  • Donald Beitz, Distinguished Professor, Animal Science
  • Carolyn Cutrona, Associate Dean of the Graduate College & Professor of Psychology
  • Ann-Marie Fiore, University Professor, Apparel, Events, and Hospitality Management
  • William Graves, Dean of the Graduate College & Professor of Horticulture
  • Leslie Hogben, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Faculty Development & Professor of Mathematics, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Daniel Nettleton, Laurence H. Baker Chair & Distinguished Professor, Biological Statistics
  • Steven Rodermel, Distinguished Professor, Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology
  • Mack Shelley, Chair and University Professor, Political Science

Workshop 3: Alignment, Trust, and Inclusiveness

Friday, September 25 (1:30-3 p.m., online via this Zoom registration web form)

Mentoring goals, mentor-mentee trust, and inclusiveness are interrelated. Participants will learn about approaches for ensuring excellence in graduate mentoring and aligning these goals. Learning objectives will include:

  • Reflecting on Workshop 2 learning objectives and key summary points
  • Discussing key characteristics of effective mentors and mentees
  • Finding ways to cultivate trust, psychological safety, and well-being
  • Exploring opportunities to advance the development of all graduate scholars and engage underrepresented students

Presenter:

Dr. Chris Hanes, Director of Student Counseling Services