Summer Workshop Series: Best Practices in Online Course Design

This 3-part series will be offered on the following days this summer:

  • May 17 – 19 (10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., in-person in 2030 Morrill Hall, or view on your own via Zoom)
  • June 20 – 22 (11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., in-person in 0013 Curtiss Hall, or view on your own via Zoom)
  • Jul. 25 – 27 (2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., in-person in 1304 Howe Hall or view on your own via Zoom)
  • Aug. 8 – 10 (10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., in-person in 2200 Marston Hall or view on your own via Zoom)
  • 3 consecutive Fridays: September 15, 22 and 29 (11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., in-person in 2030 Morrill Hall or TBA Zoom)

This series will explore best practices in online course design through the use of the Quality Matters (QM) rubric. Upon completion participants will be able to:

  • Locate CELT’s Quality Matters and online course design resources
  • Describe the Quality Matters standards and how QM can serve as a framework for course design
  • Develop an action plan that includes incremental steps for implementing Quality Matters rubric standards into their online course design

Series Facilitator: Darrin Jones, Program Coordinator, CELT and QM Coordinator

Session Descriptions

Part 1: Preparing Your Students to Learn

What do your students experience when they first interact with your course? This session will focus on developing your course introduction and aligning course and learning objectives with student assessment. Session objectives: recognize tools for introducing your course, create measurable learning objectives to guide your students’ learning, and evaluate different forms of course assessments.

Part 2: Delivering Content and Learning Activities Effectively

How do you know your students are learning? This session will help align your learning objectives with your course’s instructional content, activities and technologies as well as assess student learning and progress. Session objectives: list best practices for presenting instructional materials, apply learning activities that promote various types of interaction, and plan appropriate use of technology in your course.

Part 3: Providing Essential Learner-Centered Support

Is your course learner-centered when students access it? This session focuses on the need for clear support, accessibility and usability for all learners. Session objectives: implement essential learner support modules into your course, apply techniques to promote accessibility, and locate additional universal design for learning tools and resources to make your course accessible.

Register for one of the 3-part series offered this summer via the Learn@ISU website (http://learn.iastate.edu) or call CELT 515-294-5357


Good Course Design Makes All The Difference

Start with the end in mind. It seems like pretty straightforward advice for a lot of things in life. And, although it isn’t always considered Faculty member speaking with three strudentswhen creating a new course, or modifying an existing one, it can create a very useful framework for course design.

Often this approach to course design is called “backward design”. The process starts with identifying the course learning goals. Next, you determine the best ways to assess and evaluate if students are achieving these goals. Then after the goals and evaluation strategies are established the course content is considered. Designing and teaching courses this way puts learning first and content coverage second. It can help students achieve higher levels of cognitive development (i.e. higher order learning as described in the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy) than classes that have content coverage as a primary focus.

The CELT website has a set of resources available to help with your course design:

Additionally, CELT is offering a 5-part workshop series- Best Practices in Online Course Design starting January 31st (registration is now closed for the spring series – CELT will be offering this series again in the near future – if you are interested email CELT). The workshop series is based on the research-based Quality Matters (QM) framework. You may learn more about this framework through CELT’s Quality Matters Tracks for Faculty Development website.

(On a personal note, last fall semester I worked with a graduate student in my program to develop a non-credit online course using the Quality Matters framework. It was a big undertaking, but the QM framework provided a fantastic guide and ensured we implemented a number of best practices for online learning. We’ve had great response from many of the participants as well.)

Ann Marie VanDerZanden, Director
Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching


Iowa State’s course in personal and family finance passes quality certification

jeannanationphotoIowa State’s course in personal and family finance passes quality certification: The course, HDFS 283, taught by lecturer Jeanna Nation, recently passed its three-person external course review and can now be referenced as a Certified Quality Matters course. Nation is working through the final paperwork to receive the actual certification, but that should be completed in the next week or so. The course scored 97/99 and an 84/99 was required to pass. Contact Jeanna Nation in human development and family studies or call 515-294-8644.

 View original post on College of Human Sciences Announcements website

More information

For more information about participating in Quality Matters programming, contact CELT assistant director Allan Schmidt, 294-5357.

Visit Quality Matters Tracks for Faculty Development at Iowa State website.


Current News about Online Teaching and Learning

Starting this month CELT is beginning a campus wide promotion of the nationally recognized Quality Matters (QM) course design framework for online courses. The March 31, 2016 Inside Iowa State article describes how the QM higher education rubric can be used to evaluate an online course for both general course improvement and for external certification by the Quality Matters organization. The QM rubric is an effective course development tool because it focuses on alignment of course components including: learning objectives, assessment and measurement, instructional materials, course activities and learner interaction, and course technology.

To support this use of QM across campus CELT recently launched three professional development tracks with the goal of helping faculty enhance their online courses. The three tracks are:

  • Basics of online teaching
  • Beyond the basics of online teaching
  • Universal design for teaching online

For more information about implementing Quality Matters at ISU contact: Allan Schmidt, 294-5357 or aschmidt@iastate.edu.

 

In other news, CELT has also started a national search for our next Associate Director for Online Learning. The full position description is available on the ISU Human Resources website. This faculty appointment is 0.75 FTE Administrative in CELT /0.25 FTE academic home department. The closing date for the position is April 30, 2016. For more information please contact: Ann Marie VanDerZanden, 294-7555 or vanderza@iastate.edu.